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Global challenges and universities' response

The world has seen tremendous progress over the last decades, in terms of economic activity, general health conditions, and material welfare. However, challenges remain in terms of income distribution, environmental stress, and climate change. The UN goals for sustainable development leave a clear reminder that a number of global trends are heading in the wrong direction, and that recent developments can hardly be sustained. As pressures on the environment and the climate are looming and political tensions are building around the world, it is hard to argue that our system of education and research has been an unconditional success. This begs the question how our universities can respond, by adjusting their strategies - to challenge the weaknesses and shortcomings of the current system, and to build support for a transition to a pace and pattern of development that can be sustained over the longer term.

Klaus Mohn

Professor and rector elect, University of Stavanger

Professor Mohn holds an MSc in economics from the Norwegian School of Economics and a PhD in petroleum economics from the University of Stavanger. His background includes academic research at Statistics Norway, macroeconomic research at DNB Markets, as well as a variety of positions in economics, finance, strategy, and communication with Statoil, where he also served as corporate chief economist.

Professor Mohn holds an MSc in economics from the Norwegian School of Economics (NHH; 1991), and a PhD in petroleum economics from the University of Stavanger (2008). His background includes academic research at Statistics Norway (1992-1994), macroeconomic research at DNB Markets (1994-1996), as well as a variety of positions in economics, finance, strategy, and communication with Statoil (1996-2013), where he also served as corporate chief economist (2009-2013). Primary research interests lie in the intersection between economics, energy, and resource management, with a particular concern for the tension between energy, petroleum, and climate change, including economic spill-overs and policy implications for resource-rich economies (like Norway).